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Diary

In this blog we are posting news from around the network, reflections on general news items and other broad-ranging items of interest. Current contributors are Sightlines Initiative directors Robin Duckett, Liz Elders, Debi Keyte Hartland and Chris Merrick.

The challenge of co-constructed learning for educators in Reggio

​​I have recently been going though my Reggio Study Tour journals and came across this entry about working with new teachers and others as part of a collegiate group of co-learners. As part of a discussion group facilitated by Claudia Giudici, a conversation arose about the frustrations of working with others who may not be experienced in their roles or familiar with their approaches of working alongside children. I remember there was much talk from the international group present about trying to inspire or persuade others to work in a different way, one often perceived as the Reggio Approach. In a sense, it was about how to inspire the other, how to encourage change in those around us. Claudia reminded us that we were all educators of children i the process of change and evolving knowledge. Therefore it was necessary for us all to be aware of our roles both alongside of children and alongside of each other as educators. In working with others, she said, there was always an inherent danger of becoming the deliverer of practice or an applier of knowledge in particular methods of working. Instead, we should strive to always be co-protagonists in the learning processes of both the children and of ourselves as a team of educators and avoid seeing ourselves as any kind of expert. Claudia gave an example of how she approached a situation with two new teachers working in one of the Pre-Schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy.


"In a discussion with two new teachers, I asked, 'what do you think about how you investigate colour with children?' Their response was 'the children must learn the primary colours and of course they must learn the names of colours too.' Of course, I knew that this is what nationally we are told but I knew that this was not the approach of the children as they are interested in the nuances of colour, the many shades of colour, the uses of colour and its expressive contexts. But, if I were to tell the teachers what to do, I would deny them the opportunity to think and find understanding. I would deny them possibilities of research and learning and for me to understand something like this from a different point of view. Instead, with the atelierista, we made a proposal that activated opportunities for the two new teachers to observe the children's exploration of colour and together we reflected on the children's approaches to colour in a real context. Hence the connection of theory and practice that developed and constructed meaning for the teachers and myself and not the application of my knowledge to another. Often, Claudia continued, pedagogisti work with the teachers on their questions, their strategies, their proposals of their daily encounters with children. "We spend much time reflecting on these, not in isolation but together."

Often, Claudia continued, pedagogisti work with the teachers on their questions, their strategies, their proposals of their daily encounters with children. "We spend much time reflecting on these, not in isolation but together." In this way, the action of the educator is not to tell, to model or to demonstrate but to generate the contexts that enable other educators and ourselves to observe, document and reflect upon the approaches to learning that children make in their own contexts. It is a process that challenges the quick fix solution of training and involves a researchful, sustained and dynamic process of professional learning that is co-constructed by peers in daily practice.


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Dancing With Reggio - Metaphors for Quality

As an educator who has been following the Reggio Emilia project for about ten years now, Dancing with Reggio Emilia has been a great delight and inspiration to read. I read it on my return from the Reggio Emilia International Study Week in 2015. During the week the book was given to Robin Duckett as a gift from our Australian friends and it fell to me to write a review. I consider myself fortunate. Immersed in the ethos and principles of the Reggio Emilia project and having visited several of the Pre schools and Infant and Toddler centres, I longed to understand how the values and themes explored on the study week, worked on a daily basis. Dancing with Reggio Emilia does just this! It is a 'fly on the wall' insight into life and learning in two Reggio Schools – and much more.

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In the Spirit of the Studio : Book Review and 30%Discount

Rachel Robertson, Atelierista and Early Years Teacher at Thames Tiddlers Nursery, London September 2015

This is an inspirational book which clearly documents different stories, projects, challenges and ideas by educators, from both Reggio Emilia and North America, on the prominence of the atelier space within the schools. Examples are given from American schools inspired by the unique and creative philosophies and practices of the Reggio Emilia preschools, alongside articles and quotes from renowned creative thinkers such as Vea Vecchi, Carla Rinaldi and Loris Malaguzzi who have been key figures in the growth of the Reggio Emilia approach. In the Spirit of the Studio: Learning from the Atelier of Reggio Emilia is beautifully illustrated making visible the learning processes from both children and adults.

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