Sightlines Initiative

promoting creative and reflective practice in early childhood education

Diary

This Blog (or Diary) section has a broad mix of articles, reflections, comments, position pieces, as well as requests and information from Network members. It is becoming quite a comprehensive library. You can browse using the categories and search modules to the left.

Do contact us with your suggestions for new articles - and we really appreciate comments and other feedback.
Robin Duckett
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'Democracy has to be lived' - the first days of Reggio's preschools

We've added to our Reggio Preschools introduction page a video interview of Professor Carla Rinaldi recounting the first days of the emergence of Reggio's preschools, after the destruction of WWII: " democracy cannot be  taught but has to be lived - learned through real processes of democracy, not just about voting … but about the practice of reciprocity and mutual respect … in the processes of participating in life."

In these days, across the world, these messages are surely extremely pertinent.

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1344 Hits

The Wonder of Learning, in Boston USA

​Reggio's exhibit 'The Wonder of Learning' is currently  in Boston, and our colleague there has been telling us how inspirational it is being for parents, teachers and policymakers. "Young teachers especially," Angela Ferrario tells us are very excited - they are seeing for the first time a new vision for education, one which they'd not met before - the exhibit is acting like a light switch in to a whole new future of possibility for them."

We've known from our past experience how transformational this exhibit can be - here is an exellent video of Boston educators and policymakers reflecting on their thinking, their aspirations for education in Boston, and the vision of Reggio and the exhibit.

The art of research already exists in the hands of children acutely sensitive to the pleasure of surprise. The wonder of learning, of knowing, of understanding is one of the first, fundamental sensations each human being expects from experiences faced alone or with others. Loris Malaguzzi

You can read more about Boston's hosting of the exhibit here

The exhibit is a powerful catalyst - it's predecessor provoked powerful changes in the UK in the 2000s , and in Toronto, Canada in 2016, it was instrumental in inspiring and transforming Ontario's public policy.

You can read some more, from the Canadian experience here.






We are extremely keen to host the exhibit here in the UK - The injection of energy is again neededit is a major piece of work and we are looking for a keen main sponsor to start things off - do you know potentially interested parties? Tell us, tell them! 

Here is an introductory flyer  to download: 

Enter your text here ...

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1180 Hits

Diving into marvellous worlds, and the power of expression

I caught this morning on the radio a snatch of conversation between an author and a painter.

They were extolling wonders of the world, and the delicacies of representing them in words and images; thinking of the fascination with edges, other-worlds, human experience and communication, 'thinking hands.' I heard a brief sentence or two, but it struck so many chords with how creative educators are striving to connect with children's imaginative worlds and 'hundred languages', and create worthwhile educational environments in which children can relish them.

It was such an inspiring lift: I discovered that the two were Robert Macfarlane and Norman Ackroyd (surprise and delight!)

"The landscape painter and print-maker Norman Ackroyd meets the writer Robert Macfarlane.

Norman, who celebrated his 80th birthday this year, invites Robert to his studio in Bermondsey, London. They discuss their fascination with wild landscapes and islands, and how they attempt to come to a deeper understanding of place. They also share their thoughts on their working methods: for Norman, printmaking is like writing music - trying to capture and fix light and weather. For Robert, writing is a strange and solitary process: he reflects on the rhythm of prose and reads his latest "selkie" or seal-folk song.

Norman has been etching and painting for seven decades, with a focus on the British landscape - from the south of England to the most northerly parts of Scotland. His works are in the collections of leading museums and galleries around the world.

Robert has written widely about the natural world: his book The Old Ways is a best-selling exploration of Britain's ancient paths. Last year he published The Lost Words, a collaboration with the artist Jackie Morris, in which they aimed to bring nearby nature – the animals, trees and plants from our landscapes – back into the lives and stories of Britain's children." (BBC) 

 Here is the 'listen again' link: I hope that you will also find his inspiring and remindful of what is important for us as educators, in our quests to create heartening educational approaches, and to all children. (If the link doesn't work for you, do email me, as I downloaded the file.)

Brilliant sparks: In reading up today, I've found that Macfarlane & Morris' book has inspired at least 17 crowdfunding campaigns to make the book freely available in schools, and the John Muir Trust has made an Explorers Guide to the book. It's so heartening, isn't it, when popular actions like these are inspired by  heartfelt connections and beautiful expression?

[images from Norman Ackroyd's website; BBC; Amazon]



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1405 Hits